Sacred Landfill

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Paintings by Rob D Davies
Dates: 1 – 30 April, 2019
Location: 5 Bold Place, Liverpool, L1 9DN
Times: 24/7

Rob D Davies shows his large format and delicately rendered watercolours inspired by our desire for a utopian world set within idyllic landscapes. However, as with the modern English countryside, with its varied pockets of semi-industrial and semi-wild views, Davies mixes in the uncomfortable reality of the dirt and chaos that also surround us.

Re-frame:Treasuring What Is Left Behind.

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Re-frame:Treasuring What Is Left Behind.
Angelo Madonna
Dates: 4 – 31 March, 2019
Location: 5 Bold Place, Liverpool, L1 9DN
Times: 24/7

Angelo Madonna continues his fascination with found and discarded objects with this re-presentation and re-animation of an abandoned wardrobe. The subtly subversive furniture-sculpture hybrids provide a philosophical assessment of the wardrobe’s original function as a container of secrecy and surprise while also extending its power of suggestion along Duchampian lines.

Unnatural Swell


Unnatural Swell

Dates: 15 December 2018 – 15 January 2019
Location: 5 Bold Place, Liverpool, L1 9DN
Times: 24/7

An installation by Georgia Rusch.

Inspired by Water Babies – a Victorian allegory for the existence of the soul despite the lack of scientific evidence – Georgia Rusch has made her own Water Babies as an updated allegory of how consumption of throw-away commodities has polluted the vast, enigmatic oceans that surround us.

OUT OF THE BLUE

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Edna Thearle

Dates: 1 – 31 October, 2018
Location: 5 Bold Place, Liverpool, L1 9DN
Times: 24/7

Edna Thearle is an Ainsdale-based Designer Maker of hand-dyed and hand-woven textiles. Her wide-ranging practice encompasses printing textiles; hand and machine embroidery; colouring with synthetic and natural dyes; and constructing materials by stitching and weaving.

Edna finds inspiration in both the natural and man-made environment, which she explores through her sketchbook and photography. In Out of the Blue she combines the art of Japanese Shibori and indigo tie-dye with objet trouvé to create elaborate and unique textiles that explore the subtleties of the hand crafted object.

http://www.artinwindows.org ethearle@hotmail.co.uk

Draw Draw Draw

 

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Draw Draw Draw
Colette Lilley
Dates: 1 – 31 August, 2018
Location: 5 Bold Place, Liverpool, L1 9DN
Times: 24/7

The next artist showing at 5 Bold Place, as part of Art in Windows is Colette Lilley with her exhibition Draw Draw Draw. The exhibition which is viewed from street level, shall run from the 1st September until the 30th September 2018.

The exhibition focuses on Colette’s use of observational drawing as a form of mindfulness. Studying the form and texture of different body parts that she sees in her everyday life gives her an awareness of detail and helps to ground her in the present moment, helping her to compose her erratic thoughts.

The presence of words in the work shows the conversation between the abstract and logical process of drawing, and how the two together can tell a story and give form to her thoughts that can otherwise defy being identified.

Through drawing these images she learns about herself and the subject as it gives her insights into her thoughts and feelings that she needs to address. The paper is the safe space that she needs and the drawings are the means she needs to achieve this.

More of Colette’s work and to see what she is currently working on follow her Instagram and Twitter.

 

        

Back From The Dead

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Dates: 1 August – 31 October, 2018
Location: 57-61 Regent Road, Liverpool, L5 9SY
(on corner with Blackstone Street – don’t rely on satnav!)
Times: 07:00 – 23:00 daily

Art In Windows opens its new location in the historic, north-Liverpool docks area with a show by sculptor Adrian Jeans.

In Back From The Dead, Jeans displays portraits cast in agar jelly (more commonly used to grow bacteria in petri dishes) to explore portraiture’s search for living likeness. Unlike with traditional sculpture materials, the agar heads will be colonised, and then biologically re-animated, by bacteria floating in the air – a process that will physically alter the portraits and bring the normal ambitions of portraiture to a logical, but unexpected, conclusion